REVIEWS

Jazzit magazine, 2010
review by Luciano Vanni, director of the Jazzit magazine, journalist and jazz reviewer.
"Flamingo" cd.
Andrea Tofanelli | ACM Records (2010).

The "Flamingo" cd is the final product of a long process of musical organization according to an orchestra l style, put together in American land for the Italian trumpeter Andrea Tofanelli. The idea is to equip a big band of infinite stylistic possibilities, taking inspiration from both retrò-art sonorities and more modern solutions. The beginning of the album has a flavor of times gone by, evoking the memory and the sound of the Maynard Ferguson's orchestra, but starting the tribute to the composer Giacomo Puccini, with a swing elaboration of the famous "Nessun Dorma" aria, the spectrum of expression turns definitely more mellow. The album also contains some highly lyrical and intimate moments, as a duo with the pianist Mauro Grossi in "The Last Legend", then some Latin tinged fragments with "Father" and also a smooth funk with "Deal With It." The instrumental voice of Andrea Tofanelli stands for virtuosity, for a very bright use of vibrato, and for a strong emotional imprinting in every single note he plays.

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Musica Jazz magazine, July 2010
review by Gian Mario Maletto journalist and jazz reviewer.
"Flamingo" cd (Blue Dot: ADVICED BY MUSICA JAZZ)
Andrea Tofanelli | ACM Records (2010)

Also in the Italian Jazz there are musicians with a style worthy to be called "classic", because their way of playing recalls the comparison with the great soloists of the story. Particularly, they have an admirably perfection of style and only apparently privileged to the research for new things and to the instinct. In this rare group we have for sure the Versilian trumpeter Andrea Tofanelli, which receives support from the long-standing collaboration with Maynard Ferguson and the cult that he still keeps to the Canadian champion. His new album sees him standing out in the middle of an orchestra of well-known musicians gathered in California, conducted alternatively by the different arrangers of the charts, written using all kinds of texts, including Puccini and Modugno (and also Pino Iodice, Italian composer of "Melodia Infinita"). Two songs are written by Tofanelli himself: the "Dania's Theme" quartet and the "The Last Legend" duo, a superfine composition dedicated right to Maynard Ferguson, and that pianist Mauro Grossi knows how to share masterfully. A good and "classic" record, precisely.

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Frank Foster
(Count Basie Orchestra, Grammy awarded composer and arranger)
Liner notes of the"More Than Just Friends" cd, winner of the "SWISS JAZZ AWARD 2010".
Dani Felber's Big Band with Andrea Tofanelli lead trumpet.

..."Discommotion" gives the band an oportunity to demonstrate its musical prowness... After some exciting interplay between the saxes and brass, the blazing ensemble finishes out this tune with a big bang, but not before a screaming trumpet (Andrea Tofanelli) heats it up further with some torrid solo lines culminating in the ferocious blasting out of a triple high C. I have not heard the likes of this on any previous big band recording... I must emphasize once again that this marvelous ensemble accomplishes seemgly superhuman feats on this amazing cd...

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International Trumpet Guild, magazine, USA - March 2011
review by David Bohnert, Professor at Wayne State College, NE
Earth Games 2012
Nicola Ferro composer - Andrea Tofanelli soloist | Summit Records (2010)

"Earth Games 2012" is a diverse collection of styles peformed by some of the leading performers in the world today. The instrumentation includes a brass quartet (including Andrea Tofanelli, Joseph Alessi, Ferro and Justin B. Clark) with rhythm section and tuba, but the repertoire is anything but typical for brass quartet. The disc is a collection of four Suites intended to be a "virtual journey through time and space," inspired by Pacal Votan's (seventh-century Mayna ruler) prophecy that declares December 21, 2012, as the closing date of the current world age cycle. Many sounds on the disc are manipulated or created electronically and represent an interesting fusion of jazz, pop, blues, Eastern, and alternative styles. The performances are outstanding, and Tofanelli's stellar trumpet playing showcases his extremely wide range and easy upper register.

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International Trumpet Guild, magazine, USA
January 2011 - review by Thomas Erdmann, Professor at Elon University, NC
Flamingo
Andrea Tofanelli | ACM Records (2010)

Mixing popular music with upper range virtuosity, Andrea Tofanelli's American recording debut is a collection of original and popular pieces performed in a jazz orchestral style. With solid big band backing, featuring trumpeters like Wayne Bergeron, plus full orchestral Sinatra-styled string treatments, Tofanelli never disappoints. In sum, the Italian trumpeter has never sounded better. His tone is more round, his upper range more full-bodied, and his usual perfection of the trumpet's stratosphere even more acute than ever, which, for Tofanelli, is saying something. Whether on ballads like his own "The Last Legend" or Puccini's "Nessun Dorma", Tofanelli offers 40 minutes of guns-ablaze pyrothchnics. Light on improvised solos, the few he takes show him to be as nimble as any contemporary.

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All About Jazz 2010, USA - Review by Valerio Prigiotti, journalist, jazz musician and jazz reviewer.
"Flamingo" cd.
Andrea Tofanelli | ACM Records (2010)
(http://italia.allaboutjazz.com/php/article.php?id=5612)

Called in the United States for stages and concerts, always present in the bands of the most important italian tv shows, appreciated lead trumpet by Bruno Tommaso in the Barga Jazz Competition and by Massimo Nunzi for his projects dedicated to Stan Kenton and Maynard Ferguson. Here are some informations that may lead to the role of Andrea Tofanelli in the Italian trumpet community, appreciated for his mastery in the high register and his commitment in the educational field. Flamingo is his third CD, after Mattia's Walk and another album of Neapolitan classical music. The new experience sees him leading a powerful American orchestra, performing a repertoire designed to highlight his dominance of the extreme high range, but without forgetting a central register that really grew up over the years, getting warmer and more round. After a couple of commercial opening tunes, probably dedicated to the American market ("Volare" and "Nessun dorma") the album gets much more interesting for the jazz listener, offering more stimulating and original tunes. "The Last Legend" is a ballad for trumpet and piano, dedicated to Ferguson and able to show how, in the hands of Tofanelli, the extreme registers of the trumpet can be played with delicacy and dynamic control. "Flamingo" recalls Bud Brisbois, Maynard Ferguson's heir in the Kenton's band and in Hollywood recording studios. The virtuosity present in all Ferguson's best bands is present in Tofanelli's "To Bop," while Pino Iodice's "Melodia Infinita" arrangement is one of the most intense things of the album and allows us to appreciate Tofanelli also in the "normal" range of the instrument, more lyrical and well evident in the "Dania's Theme" flugelhorn ballad, performed with great elegance. Episodes of pleasant musical routine as "Father" or "Who's Your Daddy" alternate with more dense arrangements, like the funky "Deal With It." Ending, Flamingo cd gives us a feeling of life and energy, too often forgotten by the Jazz music today. It has a repertoire of alternative levels about Jazz, but always impeccable on the professional purposes. It makes us interested in listening Andrea exploring with greater depth more unitary directions on the aesthetic level (for example, that one indicated by "Melodia Infinita") and also interested in listening tributes to Ferguson, Kenton or Cat Anderson on cd, it is to say the subjects of many Tofanelli's concerts.

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All About Jazz 2010, USA
Review by Nicholas F. Mondello, journalist, jazz musician and jazz reviewer.
"Flamingo" cd.
Andrea Tofanelli | ACM Records (2010)
(http://www.allaboutjazz.com/php/article.php?id=36348)

Back in 1974, a French daredevil named Philippe Petit brazenly high-wire walked across the span of New York's Twin Towers. He electrified the pre-internet, pre-YouTube world by spanning the buildings on 3/4" wire cable eight times; a feat of incredible skill, athleticism and bravery later detailed in his book, To Reach the Clouds (North Point Press, 2002). With Flamingo Italian trumpeter Andrea Tofanelli magnificently performs his own incredible high-wire, high-note performance with similar bravado and trumpeting brilliance. Tofanelli has scaled the heights of his instrument and the trumpet world, with a near-superhuman ability to take the trumpet into and beyond the rarefied realm frequented by the likes of Maynard Ferguson, Cat Anderson and Bud Brisbois. No gimmicky squeak artist, Tofanelli shows that he is a pure musician-and magician-in any register. He goes where no one has before, up to the fringes of auditory recognition. Flamingo kicks off with a hip Latin rework of Domenico Medugno's '60s hit "Volare." The wordplay here is that volare, in Italian, means "to fly," and Tofanelli soars beyond the stratosphere on this and virtually every cut on . The title track could have come right from the Ferguson/Stan Kenton songbook, while the inclusion of showcase selections such as "Nessun Dorma" and "Melodia Infinita" frame Tofanelli's high-note chops in a display of all-around-the-horn musicianship. Not since Maynard Ferguson (for whom Tofanelli composed and performs "The Last Legend") reigning at the Olympus of trumpeting have such sounds been heard. Tofanelli's ability and restrained taste on flugelhorn shine beautifully. "Father" and "Dania's Theme" show that he has the intelligence and artistic heart to make it always about the music, the phrase and the ensemble, and not only the register. He avoids the temptation to take the marvelously mellow flugelhorn and scream shrilly on it, as some do. And, to his credit, this screamer can cook; his jazz chops are stellar on "To Bop." "Who's Your Daddy?," a Latin burner with Arturo Sandoval-esque overtones, completes what is a trumpeting "tour de chops." Compared to Tofanelli, any trumpeter can be tossed that query by Tofanelli. This babbo (daddy) can ask that question without reservation. The ensemble gathered for these sessions supports Tofanelli with flair on "Deal With It." The charts seem to have a European flavor, while the playing is swinging, intense and just-right tight. The band frames Tofanelli with energized, fiery support throughout. The production values are very good, certainly a challenge given Tofanelli's powerhouse performance. Ferguson, Anderson and Brisbois must be smiling in the "Upper Room," knowing that the screaming torch passed on is in such marvelously talented and musically artistic hands. Tofanelli can easily add his name to these greats in the pantheon of scream. While music lovers and musicians of all instruments will probably dig the artistry here, trumpeters will surely sit in awe of the talent, skill and musicianship of Andrea Tofanelli. A sky-high phenomenon.

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"Rendez-Vous", Luxemburg Official Magazine - 02/2007.

...Trumpet Summit: Randy Brecker, Claudio Roditi, Andrea Tofanelli, Ernie Hammes (2 Marzo 2007),
a summit of the most incredible trumpet players in the world today, something never seen in Luxemburg...

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www.thewhitonline.com, magazine, from the review of the "Maynard Ferguson Tribute" concert
at Rowan Jazz Festival, Philadelphia USA, 2007.

... "Some musicians need months to learn the music", said prof. Gorge Rabbai
of the Music Department "But with Tofanelli all worked really very well with only one rehersal".

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"One Final Trip to Birdland" by The Musings of Kev, review of the Maynard Ferguson
Tribute Concert at the Touhill Performing Arts Center in St. Louis (USA) on September 20, 2006.
*Recommended by the Maynard Ferguson Official Web Site.
(http://themusingsofkev.blogspot.com/2006/09/one-final-trip-to-birdland.html)

...The realization that Maynard was indeed an international phenomenon, as personified by two special guests: Japanese trumpeter Eric Miyashiro and the Italian Andrea Tofanelli, both of whom were outstanding...

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Fabio Ciminiera journalist and jazz reviewer - Jazz Convention year 2006 (http://www.jazzconvention.net/articoli/articolo233.html)

...The "Le Città del Jazz" story ("The Towns of Jazz") becomes populated of music and irony, winding through virtuosity of the musicians, as the screaming trumpet of Andrea Tofanelli and the energy of his brass section...

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Jazzitalia, (www.jazzitalia.net) "Piacenza Jazz Arrangers" 2006 review, International Competition for big band arrangers.

...Outstanding performance of the trumpet player Andrea Tofanelli, both on solos and lead trumpet playing...

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International Trumpet Guild, USA
Recording Reviews, "Ricordo di Napoli" CD by Thomas R. Erdmann,
ITG Jazz Editor, director of bands and trumpet professor. Elon University, Elon NC.

Italian trumpeter Andrea Tofanelli's second recording as a leader finds him as the solo voice backed by an augmented orchestra on a variety of popular Italian songs. Playing with a strong and clear tone throughout all registers, including the upper ones inhabited by Bud Brisbois, Tofanelli's ability to genuinely sing the melodies through his trumpet is never under question. Playing with a verve and gusto that harkens back to the work of Harry James, including the wide vibrato, Tofanelli is a great example of how proper air usage can open up the trumpet to a myriad of fully realized sound possibilities. A great admirer of Maynard Ferguson's, Tofanelli's first recording as a leader is a tribute to the high-note technician with whom he shares a certain élan; here, Tofanelli aims not for the technical-flash arena but instead for the emotive-feeling sphere. There is no improvisation to speak of, just well-played, polished recordings of heart-rending tunes. Perhaps best described as a technically perfect instrumental couterpart to Andrea Bocelli, Tofanelli shows why his fame is beginning to build steam outside of his native country.

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International Trumpet Guild, USA
Recording Reviews,"Mattia's Walk and Tribute to Maynard Ferguson" CD
by David A. Johnson, professor of harmony, Berklee College of Music, Boston MA.

The first solo effort, recorded in 2000, from the Italian jazz trumpeter Andrea Tofanelli, is sub-titled "Tribute to Maynard Ferguson." And there is much of the spirit of Maynard in evidence throughout this collection. Tofanelli possesses a fearsome command of the trumpet's extreme upper register and is not afraid to use it. In addition to attempting the tour-de-force, "Maynard Ferguson," that Maynard himself performed with the Stan Kenton orchestra in the early 1950s, Tofanelli spreads his high notes liberally throughout this set of contemporary compositions that are mostly in the Latin and Latin Jazz genres. On several tracks, through the technological wizardry of over-dubbing, Tofanelli creates a whole trumpet section of lead players, each one trying to out-blow the other. The rhythm section, with a few personnel changes from track to track, is excellent, ably supporting Tofanelli's solo work. There are a number of guest musicians on the CD as well. Particularly notable are the solo contributions of Mauro Negri on clarinet and Roberto Martinelli on alto saxophone. Most of Tofanelli's solos, however, are gratuitous forays into the upper register. He tends to make much more meaningful musical statements when he is playing flugelhorn or harmon-muted trumpet. The sound quality is generally excellent, with good clarity and separation. I must admit that after repeated hearings I grew to enjoy this music, as one might enjoy other guilty pleasures. If you subscribe to the "higher and louder" school of trumpet playing, this CD is for you.

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Francesco Martinelli, journalist and jazz reviewer
All About Jazz 2003: Barga Jazz Competition 2003, Lee Konitz.

...Among the brasses, Andrea Tofanelli for his high register work is the closest approximation to Maynard Ferguson that Italy has ever produced, but he's also a sensitive soloist who displayed his talents on fluegelhorn in a quartet intermission set over a lovely original...

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Jazzitalia - Marco Losavio, journalist, jazz musician and jazz reviewer, May 2003
"Mattia's Walk & Tribute To Maynard Ferguson."

Andrea Tofanelli is a trumpeter with multiple and widely varied experiences ranging from classical to commercial music, from jazz to Latin, to trumpet sections of several orchestras. His most important characteristics are his technique and the way he uses his trumpet playing on the very high notes. His instrument goes up touching peaks where notes rarely live because there's not enough oxygen to keep them there, but the sustain is strongly supported. Although he flies very high, sound is clear, full, the phrasing is adequately sophisticated and the dynamics absolutely under control. As a matter of fact, don't think about extreme tones obtained in a circensian way, but think about blaring high notes, functional to this style coming from Maynard Ferguson, Arturo Sandoval or Gillespie. The CD is dedicated to Ferguson and contains a sweetmeat, which is to say the "re-recording" of the concert that Ferguson recorded in 1954 with Stan Kenton. Until now, noone else has attempted to re-recorded that concert, so Tofanelli's version is actually the only one in existence besides Ferguson's original. In this CD we also find a lot of Latin music like Cha Cha, Samba, Partido Alto, Bayon, Bossanova and a Jazz Ballad, "For So Many Years" composed by Tofanelli himself (composer of most of the pieces). Here Tofanelli shows his absolute mastery with a kind of sound I could define as "normal," in a Chet Baker style, very charming. Beautiful tune. There's place also for a very agreeable Acid Jazz contamination: "Modern Child" composed by Tofanelli. High praise to Tofanelli's partners too: Sandro Debellis on percussion, Tony Arco on drums and Carmelo Isgrò on bass remarkably contribute to this rhythmical music in an impeccable way. We would also be remiss not to recognize the piano player Nelson Betancourt who harmonically sustains Tofanelli's evolutions and never is unprepared when he exchanges solos with him. Likewise, the wonderful clarinet of Mauro Negri gives a true high quality touch during his solos. I must point out other excellent contributions given by Roberto Martinelli on alto sax, Massimo Zanotti on trombone, Riccardo Fioravanti on contrabass, and Mauro Grossi on piano (also arranger of the "Maynard Ferguson" concert). In conclusion, this is a CD spitting energy and desire and venting a contagious joy of playing music through notes uttered by the instrument and a splendid use of rhythm.

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Alex Sullivan, journalist and music reviewer - Il Corriere di Sesto (Milan), March 2003
"Ricordo di Napoli."

Only a versatile trumpet player like Andrea Tofanelli is able to organize such a perfect instrumental tribute to the most truthful Neapolitan music tradition, and this recording is as excellent as the best movie soundtracks of this genre, for sure. Everlasting Neapolitan songs as "o Sole mio," "Malafemmena," "Torna a Surriento," "Voce e' notte," "Na' sera e' Maggio," "Malafemmena," and "Reginella" are for the first time arranged in a fresh and enjoyable project, not commercial at all. It's a bright idea, because all these songs are not sung by the usual "fat" Neapolitan voice, drenched with dull and easy melody...On the contrary, there is a blazing "lead trumpet," able to play exciting solos and alternating a sweet fluidity with a powerful "jazz drive," replacing the human voice and "vocalizing" these popular Italian melodies...

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Alex Sullivan, journalist and music reviewer - Il Corriere di Sesto (Milan), February 2003
"Mattia's Walk & Tribute To Maynard Ferguson."

I must confess that I have been completely ravished by the tribute to Maynard Ferguson recorded on this CD by Andrea Tofanelli, a musician who shows extreme feeling in all his interpretations, as well as an excellent technique which makes him a phenomenal trumpet player. This CD is a very pleasant jazz adventure through Samba, Bossanova, Latin Jazz and Cha Cha, soaring at the end into exciting Acid Jazz and Latin Funk atmospheres. All the 12 tracks listed on this CD (6 covers and 6 written by Tofanelli himself) are "sung" by the masterful and stratospheric trumpet of Andrea, who has on this occasion called upon some good friends and collegues (well-known and skilled musicians of the Italian Jazz scene) such as Nelson Betancourt, Roberto Martinelli and the great Jazz A rt Orchestra directed by Carlo Gelmini for the exceptional tribute to Maynard Ferguson, whereTofanelli is the astonishing soloist. After this recording Andrea was contacted by Maynard himself and asked to appear as a speecial guest of the Big Bop Nouveau Band during Maynard's performance in Casalmaggiore (Italy, May 7, 2000), a special event in his rich career which will remain indelible in the memory of this generation of music fans.

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www.Italianmusicawards.it, November 2002
"Mon Petit Garçon" album review, by the well-known Italo-French singer YuYu.

...The music of the CD totally satisfies the expectations of the most qualified and hard to please listeners, being able to appreciate such an accurate artistic production where even the computer sequences are played live in studio. An album which is able to transport worthy refinements of the best Sade to a full Lounge and Chill Out field, travelling on the breaths of masters like Claudio Pascoli (saxophone), Andrea Tofanelli (trumpet and flugel) and Massimo Zanotti (trombone)...

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All About Jazz 2002: review of the Barga Jazz Competition 2002,
Thelonious Monk .

...However, the jury has pointed out the very high level of the competition...
Andrea Tofanelli was in the limelight as an excellent soloist...

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Alessandro Staiti, journalist and jazz reviewer - All About Jazz 2002
Barga Jazz Competition 2002, Thelonious Monk .

...Tonight the Barga Jazz Big Band plays compositions from the "original music section" of the Barga Jazz Competition, starting with " Congressional Roll Call " by Scott Reeves, American musician. This is a very articulate and complex composition (perhaps even too complicated) in its rhythmic structure, so it forces the orchestra to meet very stringent demands. In the middle of this structure, the composition moves to Latin atmospheres, introducing the crystalline solo of Tofanelli's trumpet, then moving to free jazz for ending...
...then it's time to listen to the melancholy "Notte di Marzo," with an intense solo by Andrea Tofanelli in the absolute silence of the orchestra...The "Notte di Marzo" composition justly wins the competition...

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Aldo Gianolio, journalist, musician and jazz reviewer, 2002
Liner notes of the "Sound and Images" CD, Morenghi-Borgazzi Quartet.

...in "Metropolitan Tribal Dance," "Colours" and "Sound and Images" the quartet becomes a sextet with the addition of the brilliant and extroverted trumpet of Andrea Tofanelli, whose impeccable technique gives him absolute control on the high range...

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Massimo Monti, MAP Producer, 2002
Liner notes of the " Sound and Images" CD, Morenghi-Borgazzi Quartet.

...Like different parts of a painting, each with its own color and atmosphere, these all come together to make up a single, harmonious "picture" called "Sounds and Images." One notices immediately the original interpretation, the exuberant phrasing in the overlapping notes of the wind instruments, and that "touch of class" lent by Andrea Tofanelli on the trumpet...

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Adamo Cordati, journalist and jazz reviewer - All About Jazz 2001
Barga Jazz July-August 2001.

... Mr. Francesco Martinelli, president of the jury, has emphasized the high level of the competition, and praised the impeccable performance of the orchestra in which we must give a special mention to soloists such as trumpet player Andrea Tofanelli...

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Steven Loewy, journalist and Jazz reviewer - Double Time Jazz, 2001
"Mattia's Walk & Tribute to Maynard Ferguson."

Italian trumpeter Andrea Tofanelli calls this recording a tribute to Maynard Ferguson, and it is easy to see why. The Italian leads his Jazz Art Orchestra through a series of showcases that reflects the same wild exuberance of some of Ferguson's mid- and late-career crossover escapades. Tofanelli is a masterful technician with a flare for the stratospheres. On Shorty Rogers' "Maynard Ferguson," one might even swear the Italian was the real thing, that's how good he is. As with Ferguson, there are excesses and little emphasis on subtlety, but it is all in good fun, and his showmanship qualities are impressive. Tofanelli gives this one a Cuban flare, with danceable beats and upbeat rhythms. There are some decent solos too, as Tofanelli has attracted some fine members from the vibrant Italian jazz scene: lesser known musicians such as clarinetist Mauro Negri and pianist/arranger Mauro Grossi. The band is polished, sometimes even slick at times. But for those who enjoy accessible big band Latin sounds and impressive trumpet technique, this should prove satisfying.

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Luigi Sidero, journalist and jazz reviewer - All About Jazz, 2001
"Mattia's Walk & Tribute to Maynard Ferguson."

An explosive trumpet and a marked inclination for Latin rhythms make this "Mattia's Walk & Tribute to Maynard Ferguson" CD a truly joyful explosion. Double and triple high notes are definately Andrea Tofanelli's trademarks... choosing a powerful virtuosity as the main expression of his music, articulating daring phrases and pushing more and more to his upper range, but always maintaining a full control of his instrument and of his sound. Not a sober style, for sure, but fascinating for his excellent qualities as soloist, being able to explore the inner depth of a ballad ("For So Many Years") and at the same time trying "to demolish all" on wild Latin pieces like "Nigerian Marketplace" or "Round Dance." Tofanelli's style is close to the "Cuban" Gillespie (as Mr. Enrico Rava explains in the liner notes, exalting the talent of Tofanelli), so he's astonishing, amusing and ravishing, with many excellent musicians on the scene. It's hard not to get drunk following the hyperbolic evolutions of his trumpet!

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Aldo Gianolio, journalist, jazz musician and jazz reviewer - Musica Jazz, May 2002
"Mattia's Walk & Tribute to Maynard Ferguson."

Tofanelli, Italian trumpet player, has been the only one in Italy to receive the honor of being invited to perform with the Maynard Ferguson's orchestra in Italy, and we can understand why: his technique, very similar to that of the great Canadian trumpet master, is astonishing for its absolute mastery in the high range notes. Andrea enjoys emphasizing this range, and on this CD he is able to do it very well. Into a general straight feel atmosphere we can find different genres of music, almost based on Latin American rhythms (Samba, Cha Cha Cha, Bossanova, Bayon, Mambo). But the most important things are Tofanelli's solos, some of them truly priceless.

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Jack Bowers, journalist and jazz reviewer - Cadence Magazine, October 2001
"Mattia's Walk & Tribute to Maynard Ferguson."

Trumpeter Andrea Tofanelli employs a larger supporting cast on this CD, and one needn't listen long to identify his leading role model. But in case it's not readily apparent, the title of the last selection (Shorty Rogers' dramatic showpiece, "Maynard Ferguson") should clear any lingering uncertainty. Tofanelli has obviously been practicing his high notes for years and uses them to great effect throughout this formidable exercise in mostly Latin-leaning jazz. Although Tofanelli doesn't play the MF Superbone, he does manage (through overdubbing) to become a full-fledged trumpet section on five numbers. He's accompanied on "Maynard Ferguson" by two other trumpeters (F. Bosso and A. Guzzoletti) and the Jazz Art Orchestra of Parma conducted by Carlo Gelmini. That's a highlight, but there are many others on this frequently marvelous album. Given Tofanelli's awesome technique and luminous sound, it's no surprise to learn that he is a classically trained musician who has paid his dues working as lead trumpet and soloist in everything from concert ensemble to big bands and has performed with any number of renowned jazz musicians (including Maynard Ferguson). When one is able to leave as talented a fellow trumpeter as Enrico Rava "speechless" after a rehearsal, there's obviously more in his knapsack than smoke and mirrors, although Tofanelli does not smoke in the best sense of the word. In the liner notes, Rava portrays Tofanelli's work on this album as comparable to another high-flying trumpeter, Arturo Sandoval, and that's a fairly even-handed assessment. He also praises the leader's sidemen, and there too he's squarely on the mark, as the various combos lend unremitting support on all the compositions of the CD. The rhythms range from Cha Cha to Samba, Bayon to Bossa, with some Latin Funk, Acid Jazz and even a ballad or two thrown in for seasoning, and Tofanelli proves a master of them all. While he's a sharp improviser it's his dazzling high-register sorties that take one's breath away and raise the hair on neck and arms. The sound quality of the recording is no better than adeguate but Tofanelli rises above that as well to submit further convincing proof, if any were needed, that musical talent knows no boundaries.

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Fio Zanotti, awarded Italian arranger, 2001
Liner notes of the "Ricordo di Napoli" CD.

Sound, swing and range are uncommon traits with which all musicians are not gifted. When one finds a musician with all of these qualities, one is compelled to compliment him. This is the case with Andrea Tofanelli, exceptional trumpet player who is at this point always present at my sessions. It is with immense pleasure that I wish him the great success which he deserves.

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Peppe Vessicchio, awarded Italian arranger, 2001
Liner notes of the "Ricordo di Napoli" CD.

......lots of heart, extraordinary technique and enviable versatility put Andrea Tofanelli in the first class both as a Big-band section player, and as a lyricist of popular Italian ethnic melodies. A well-rounded intrumentalist and stylist who serves as an excellent example for those who wish to take on every aspect of a full career in music.

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Davide Ielmini, journalist and jazz reviewer, September 2000
Liner notes of the "Mattia's Walk & Tribute to Maynard Ferguson" CD.

If jazz is your chosen profession, Andrea Tofanelli's name has already been a landmark in your career for some time. You have heard him in the orchestra that enters the competition for the best arrangements at the Barga Jazz Festival (Italy) every year: that's where director and arranger Bruno Tommaso wanted to see him and that's where he has on more than one occasion rewarded Andrea's artistic skills, which it would be inappropriate to call standard. It was also on that same stage that famous Italian trumpeter Enrico Rava managed to smooth away the care lines of the severe teacher and gave Andrea the smile you give to a friend. Maybe even as an admirer (or a talent scout?). But Tofanelli also means famous Italian rapper Jovanotti (Andrea was a member of the brass line-up that accompanied him on his "Lorenzo-L'Albero 1997" Tour); it means popular Italian artist Demo Morselli and it means the TV networks Mediaset and RAI (popular Italian artist Adriano Celentano's big TV show "Francamente me ne infischio"). Also, in 1996, Peter Erskine asked Tofanelli to play lead trumpet in the orchestra that accompanied him on the Italian tour. Altogether, that makes this Tofanelli into a musician of many faces, not least because there are two sides to him: one is the showman (and you can hear it in the way he goes about a musical rendering), magnificently prepared to 'soften' even the most demanding compositions, while the other is the artist more of the essence than of the appearance, who draws his inspiration from the great masters of jazz and Latin jazz, such as Arturo Sandoval. But there's more to him than that: he also leaves a little space over for his youthful cross-fertilization with acid jazz, to which he applies a solid artistic reasoning designed to make sure it stays out of trouble. Tofanelli lightens, amuses, involves and pulls you with him. Especially when he decides to record that hyperbolic concert, "Maynard Ferguson" (nobody had ever tried to record it in the original version since back in 1956): that certainly does the lungs, the throat and the lips a load of good. It's a track that you are hard put to describe in any other way than as the ultimate trumpeter's nightmare: it might as well be an examination at the conservatory. But Andrea is not content with 'just' risking the recording, oh no: he actually takes the tape and sends the thing to Ferguson, who recognizes talent when he hears it and invites Tofanelli to a gig in Italy, where he soon joins Maynard up there on stage! Sooner or later, someone is bound to advise Andrea to change genre: such a jazz talent shouldn't be 'wasted' on the skitty little steps and swivelling hips of the Bossanova or the Mango. Are his sharps too targeted and professional for an audience that can't stand Jazz but loves to dance? No. Tofanelli is a fine 'musical surgeon': he operates on assembling serious musicianship with dedication to entertainment and popular enthusiasm. And yet this album will open the ears of the jazz aficionados: they'll be listening to Mauro Grossi's and Mauro Negri's playing, to the edge of the Jazz Art Orchestra on "Maynard Ferguson" to the rhythm (which is practically everything in Latin jazz) and to Andrea's soaring notes that squeeze between the column of air and the pressure on the mouthpiece to make you feel them like ice-cubes on naked skin. When you listen to this CD, it won't be so difficult for you to start thinking about Cuba, but it will be more the island of Ry Cooder and his Buena Vista Social Club (the artistic consistency of the event) than the paradise of beaches and minibikinis you see in the holiday brochures. The contrast that comes about between the 'marketable' consumer product and the work of art to be used for 'targeted' listening is Andrea's strongest point: he knows how to reconcile form to content and content to what his listeners want to hear - all without too many compromises. And those listeners are free to choose whether they prefer to dance till they drop or let their hair down listening to those harmonics.

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Bruno Tommaso, awarded jazz master and big band director and arranger, September 2000:
Liner notes of the "Mattia's Walk & Tribute to Maynard Ferguson" CD

There are plenty of reasons for appreciating the music on this album: it's fresh, effervescent, it enjoys life and playing and it conveys vitality and feelings with no holds barred and no intellectual barriers. Then, there is that fine lesson of professionalism: quite a significant matter these days if you remember that, if you want to achieve any artistic project of any kind at all, no matter how varied and different, it is useful and sometimes indispensable to have all those skills and versatility and to be ready to take the plunge yourself. So instrumentalists - I'm sorry, that should be musicians - of the stature of Andrea Tofanelli are more than welcome: one quite significant factor is that Andrea has given evidence of his ability to attract a rather respectable array of fellow travelers, such as Mauro Grossi, Roberto Martinelli and Mauro Negri, the pleasant discovery of Betancourt and the enviable rhythm sections that alternate on the tracks. Tofanelli certainly strikes you as a virtuoso; some may find him excessively acrobatic: but why not? There's nothing in the Constitution to prohibit going all the way, so if a young artist wants to exaggerate, let him do so by all means: he'll have plenty of time in later life for moments of meditation - and there's no hard and fast rule that says they might not be on their way right now. To tell the truth, behind what sounds like carefree abandon there's evidence of study, enthusiasm, dedication and sacrifice: put them all together and they give us a comprehensive listing of genres in that highly imaginative world that ranges between Jazz and Latin American culture, with bright splashes of color and multi-rhythmic accuracy, ending up with an interesting composition by Shorty Rogers, deliciously offered up here in a version that is clearly not photocopied, and yet so faithful that I would risk calling it philological. Well done, Andrea!

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Enrico Rava, awarded international jazz master and trumpet player, October 2000:
Liner notes of the "Mattia's Walk & Tribute to Maynard Ferguson" CD.

At this point in my life, I have listened to so much music and so many musicians that nothing surprises me anymore (or almost). But I must confess that when I went to Barga Jazz Festival (Italy) this summer and heard the orchestra rehearsals for the first time, especially when I heard Andrea Tofanelli for the first time as he guided the trumpet section from stratospheric heights with swing and sound as big as a house, I was left literally speechless and very keen on getting to know better this musician whose trumpet seems to start where it leaves off for most other trumpeters. Andrea gives his best from C sharp on, and in his case, that "on" means that he still has another octave and a half (and even more) to play with, and there are no wheezes, screams or uncontrolled effects, but just real notes, full, clear and as precise as a sword slash, with articulate, coherent phrasing, absolute mastery of dynamics, plenty of heart and truly considerable expressiveness. At Barga Jazz Festival, we worked together for four days, which gave me a chance to appreciate Andrea's musical and personal gifts and his great love for the music and for his instrument all the more. I had a chance to hear him playing both in the orchestra, as lead trumpet (a role he plays exceptionally and quite unusually, as he acts as lead trumpet, acutist and soloist, all at the same time), in jam sessions, as improviser, and he caught my breath with the way he controls his instrument in areas that are a no-man's land to most musicians and with the freshness of his inspiration, all accompanied by a rather rare modesty. Those are the reasons why I am very happy to write these few lines of introduction to this CD, which communicates about Andrea in a new light, that of the composer and band leader. These are parts he plays very intelligently, totally aware of his abilities and characteristics. The music you will hear on this album is ideal for bringing out Tofanelli's qualities: his way of playing is certainly closer to Latin American music, Gillespie's Cuban sound or, if you like, Arturo Sandoval, than to the jazz of Miles Davis or Chet Baker. In a certain sense, this is not really a jazz album at all, if by jazz you mean the strict sense of the word, although it is crammed full of great Italian jazz musicians and quality jazz solos. I think this album is actually somewhere midway between jazz and Latin American, somewhere in the wake of Paquito D'Riveira or Sandoval. This music is pure fun, but it is also rich in inspiration, designed to show off Tofanelli's virtuoso skills and unique abilities: if you are a trumpet lover, it's bound to catch your imagination.

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DICHIARAZIONE SOSTITUTIVA DI CERTIFICAZIONE
(art. 45 e 46 D.P.R. 445/2000)

Il sottoscritto Andrea Tofanelli nato a Viareggio (Lu) il 26/07/1965, residente a Torre del Lago Puccini (Lu) in Via G. Verdi 7, consapevole delle sanzioni penali richiamate dall‘art. 76 del D.P.R. 28/12/00 n. 445 in caso di dichiarazioni mendaci e della decadenza dei benefici eventualmente conseguenti al provvedimento emanato sulla base di dichiarazioni non veritiere, di cui all‘art. 75 del D.P.R. del 28/12/00 n. 445; ai sensi e per gli effetti dell‘art. 46 del citato D.P.R. 445/2000; sotto la propria responsabilitá D I C H I A R A che tutte le recensioni sopra elencate corrispondono a veritá e sono state pubblicate su riviste specializzate o su fonti autorizzate su Internet. Ognuna di queste fonti é stata specificata ad ogni recensione.
Torre del Lago Puccini, lì 20/06/2011

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